Canadian minister underlines Vietnam’s role in CPTPP negotiation

Sunday, 2018-03-11 21:31:23
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Canadian Minister of International Trade Francois-Philippe Champagne (Image: Reuters)
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NDO - Vietnam plays an important part in the negotiation of the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), according to Canadian Minister of International Trade Francois-Philippe Champagne.

In an interview, the Canadian official spoke highly of the leadership of Vietnam’s Prime Minister and Minister of Industry and Trade during the process.

Canada wishes to consolidate the relationship with Vietnam, he noted, adding that with CPTPP, the two nations can increase their trade exchange, particularly between small- and medium-sized enterprises of the two nations.

Canada and Vietnam will collaborate to ensure that the agreement will be effective and benefit people in line with commitments stated in the deal, the minister said, adding that he hopes the two countries will start with cutting tariffs to facilitate trade exchange.

He expressed his delight when Canada, together with Vietnam and other member nations, will establish regulations on trading in Asia-Pacific region in a fair, progressive and open manner, thus facilitating win-win, fair and balanced trade exchange.

Explaining the deal’s concepts of “comprehensive” and “progressive” initiated by Canada, the minister said the CPTPP aims to benefit not only big companies but also the people, adding that anyone can trade with new markets.

According to the Canadian minister, the CPTPP will benefit Vietnamese and Canadian people alike. The world will consider it a model for progressive and inclusive trade, he said.

The official signing of CPTPP took place in Santiago de Chile on March 8 (local time), with the participation of representatives from 11 member countries, namely Chile, Australia, Brunei, Canada, Malaysia, Mexico, Japan, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore and Vietnam.

The pact will come into force 60 days after it is fully ratified by at least six of the 11 members.

Source: VNA