Khanh Hoa: Endangered 9.5kg sea turtle released back to the sea

Wednesday, 2018-04-18 09:18:42
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The olive ridley sea turtle was released to Khanh Hoa sea. (Photo: ENV)
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NDO – A rare olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) weighing over 9.5kg has been released back into the environment after getting caught in a local fishing net in Khanh Hoa province.

According to the nature conservation NGO Education for Nature - Vietnam (ENV), the Khanh Hoa provincial Department of Fisheries received the olive ridley turtle yesterday after it had been voluntarily transferred by local fishermen.

Earlier, the ENV received a report through its conservation hotline 1800-1522 from local people wishing to deliver an olive ridley sea turtle which became trapped in their net while fishing. The centre later contacted Khanh Hoa Fisheries to quickly rescue the endangered turtle.

There have been increased cases of the voluntary transfer of rare sea turtles found trapped in fishing nets by local fishermen, contributing to the preservation of this endangered species. It is a good sign showing the improved awareness of local people in the protection of sea turtles in particular and of Vietnamese wildlife in general, said the ENV.

The rare sea turtle was found trapped in a fishing net by local fishermen and they voluntarily handed it to local authorities. (Photo: ENV)

The olive ridley is one of five species of sea turtles present in Vietnam, alongside loggerhead, green, hawksbill, and leatherback sea turtles. All of the aforementioned endangered species are under protection according to Decree No. 160/2013/NĐ-CP. All acts of illegally hunting, killing, capturing, storing, transporting, or trafficking of sea turtles or their parts and products are serious law violations and may be subject to criminal prosecution under Article 244 of the Penal Code, with a penalty of up to 15 years in prison.

The ENV’s 1800-1522 hotline not only receives notifications of violations related to wildlife, but also supports locals who wish to transfer wild animals to competent authorities.